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Gallery

Too often we assume art to require interpretation.

But in Andrew Masullo’s vibrant paintings, form and color remind us that art doesn’t need to broadcast meaning to be meaningful.

Andrew Masullo’s work has been featured in dozens of exhibitions in the US and abroad. Recent solo appearances include shows at Texas Gallery in Houston and Mary Boone Gallery in New York City. In 2012, he participated in the Whitney Biennial. He lives in San Francisco.

We had a fun conversation with Andrew back in 2012 and felt it was time to catch up. 

Selections from Masullo’s recent paintings are on view at Boston’s Steven Zevitas Gallery through March 21, 2015.

All images used with permission. Copyright © the artist, all rights reserved.

The Morning News:

Tell me something about your paintings that most people don’t know.

Andrew Masullo:

The paintings are by-products of the process.

TMN:

Has there ever been a time when you didn’t paint anything?

AM:

I’ve spent most of my life not painting anything.

TMN:

Imagine an exploding box of glitter. Nuisance or art?

AM:

“Something is a work of art when it has filled its role as therapy for the artist.” Louise Bourgeois.

TMN:

Something from your childhood that you wish would come back into fashion?

AM:

I miss the days when only men in the armed forces and sideshow freaks were tattooed.

TMN:

What’s the worst advice you’ve ever given?

AM:

In 1981, I took my own advice and began working in a reinsurance company. I quit after two days. It was my last fling at adulthood.

TMN:

Skydiving or bungee jumping?

AM:

Hot air ballooning.

TMN:

When do you lie?

AM:

When I sleep.

TMN:

Would you rather be a turtle or a squirrel?

AM:

A squirrel if I don’t become road kill, a turtle if I don’t become soup.

TMN:

If this were your very last conversation, how would you sign off?

AM:

I wouldn’t.

Karolle Rabarison is at home wherever she can satisfy her coffee habit. She currently lives in Washington, DC. More by Karolle Rabarison