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Headlines Edition

Friday Headlines: How can you consciously contemplate?

The third Democratic presidential primary debate's winners and losers, according to the New York Times opinion desk.

The US government's budget deficit has broken the $1 trillion mark for the first time in seven years.

California passes a bill banning for-profit prisons and immigration detention facilities in the state.

US voters of color may be further disenfranchised by the closing of more than 1,000 polling places suspected of racial discrimination.

The "slow-motion disaster" of flooding along the Missouri, Mississippi, and Arkansas Rivers in the first half of 2019.

Background checks aren't especially effective in reducing gun deaths. Gun licensing, on the other hand, actually works.

Social media—and society at large—would probably be better without likes, but users don't want to give up the engagement.

Homicide experts estimate there are between 2,000 and 4,000 active serial killers in the US.

"If a piece of clothing costs you $19.99, that means the person who made it was paid 19 cents."

Comparing school districts 20 years ago and today to find which have become more diverse, and which remain deeply segregated.

“Four or five times a year, you find yourself in a place where people understand what you’re going through and you’re not so much the minority.” On disabled athletes and the desire to compete, rather than be a figure in an against-all-odds tale.

In a clip from a 1985 short by Richard Linklater, a young Daniel Johnston, who died this week at age 58, briefly talks about his new album, Hi, How Are You.

Singer Eddie Money—known for “Two Tickets to Paradise”—has died at age 70.

Investigating whether David Bowie really did—as he claimed—intentionally set fire to his Glass Spider stage prop in 1987.

A trailer for Tate Britain's new Blake exhibition digitally animates his paintings on the London streets he frequented.

Photos of people taking photos at national parks, by Brittney Denham.