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Friday Headlines: Telling lies.

In a bombshell new revelation, federal law enforcement officers say Trump directed Cohen to lie under oath to Congress about ongoing negotiations for a Moscow Trump Tower—even as Trump told the public he had no business dealings in Russia. The House Intelligence committee says it will investigate.

Related: In his confirmation hearings this week to become attorney general, William Barr said a president telling a witness to lie would constitute obstruction of justice.

The Trump administration appears to have separated thousands more migrant children from their parents than previously thought.

The Supreme Court may yet have the final say on Trump's 2020 census citizenship question.

The Trump overload, graphed: the percentage of New York Times articles that have mentioned each president since 1981.

The World Health Organization lists the anti-vaccination movement among its top threats to world health.

In 1950, feds raided Scientific American, seizing every issue with an article questioning the ethics of the hydrogen bomb.

A brief history of viral gymnastics routines, including some pre-internet routines that still deserve viral fame.

Attention Tournament of Books fans: Here are your 2019 ToB brackets.

Help support TMN and the Tournament of Books when you buy merch at the TMN Store. (Members get 50% off!)

Video: "The Place Where" is a beautiful and eerie visual poem by Tim Sessler.

The spontaneity of online radio feels like an essential rejection of today’s automated environment, but it’s part of a long history of independent distribution. In Britain, pirate radio became an essential part of youth culture starting in the 1960s, playing genres like rock and pop, which the official BBC stations refused to do. To break free of the algorithm—and enjoy music that isn’t collecting your data—independent online radio is the answer.

Popular songs are getting shorter—possibly due to streaming services, which pay the same for every song, no matter its length.

See also: The perfect song length is two minutes and 42 seconds.

Finding total ambient silence is just one challenge in building a sound bank to preserve the Stradivarius's unique qualities.

Greenland tops the list in a project to map the world's 100 largest islands; after that, it's a lot of surprises.

She’s been most surprised by narratives in people’s speech that seem to unfold, piecemeal, over days. Early on, one man talked about a train stuck at a station, then days later referred to the repaired train, and then weeks later to how the train was moving northward. Seeking insights into people’s final words, and why they speak them.

Ideas of three-dimensional space are rethought in artist Gabrielle Teschner's Sculpture That Is Flat series.