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Friday headlines: You’re (not) on a boat

US prosecutors inadvertently reveal in a recently unsealed court filing that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been charged.

A new food truck in Washington, sponsored by MoveOn, is serving free ice cream with Mueller-related themes.

A growing number of Conservative MPs submit letters expressing no confidence in Theresa May amid turmoil over Brexit.

See also: A good guide as to the current state of Brexit.

Britain traditionally looks down at countries who elect a Berlusconi or a Trump. And yet here comes a Boris Johnson premiership.

There’s nothing at all nefarious about any of Florida's protracted counting of votes. But beware what it suggests for 2020.

Japan's newly appointed minister responsible for cybersecurity admits he's never used a computer before.

Photographs of people using smartphones.

"Sometimes a narrative can satisfy because it is beguiling, not because it is true." How podcasts work.

Most 20- to 40-somethings didn’t grow up with a torque wrench in one hand and a soldering gun in the other. While our parents’ generation spent their teens rebuilding old cars, we spent our time building websites. Why millennials aren’t buying boats.

A writer sums up her long investigation into the decline in sex among 20-somethings. Conclusion? Almost too many reasons to count.

Scientists find that hurricanes now dump 20 percent more rain, thanks to climate change.

Many wildfires are caused by downed power lines. One of California's biggest utilities faces billions of dollars in liability.

A cactus-like plant in Morocco is 10,000 times hotter than the world’s hottest pepper. It's also a promising painkiller.

A day in the life, then and now, of Michelle Obama's personal stylist.

Things you don’t know about clothes until you become a personal shopper at Barneys.

Very little is known as to why we have pubic hair, and scientists don't really care—because it never caused problems until people started to remove it.