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Headlines edition

Saturday headlines: Love. Sandwiches.

The five-day siege of Southern California is beginning to come into focus, with more than 500 structures burned. An LATimes photographer explains how to shoot wildfires.

Human rights activists in Singapore explain what it’s like to work in a country where conversations can be illegal.

Authoritarian governments and despots like Assad and Duterte find comfort in claiming #metoo on Mr. Trump’s "fake news."

“America first, which means Trump first, is perhaps the only principle that can trump Trump’s pro-Israel approach. Israel will need to remember it, too.” Kushner’s Jerusalem gambit means the US now has the power to blame Netanyahu if a peace deal goes sour.

Sandy Hook survivors continue to lobby Washington for gun control, insistent that change is possible.

A surge to buy guns after Sandy Hook caused 60 accidental gun deaths. Twenty of those killed were children—the same amount shot at Sandy Hook.

By the end of the 20th century, more people in Britain made or sold sandwiches than worked in agriculture.

A new worry for South Korea’s winter Olympics organizers: widespread hypothermia, thanks to cheap construction.

With the US out of the running, an interactive quiz helps you pick which World Cup team to root for.

LeBron James is 15 seasons into his career and still improving, primarily by shooting better, no matter that he’s playing 37 minutes per night.

"The world is more complicated than we can ever comprehend." Beguiling wood sculptures by Yoshitoshi Kanemaki.

Nvidia’s computer vision team published research showing how their AI can change the weather—from snowy to sunny, or sunny to rainy—in images.

Video: An insider's tour of a Brooklyn recycling plant.

“Phantom debt” schemers target millions of Americans. After thousands of phone calls, one target got his revenge.

Take Weird Al seriously and you can see how pop culture peaked, then disappeared.