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Headlines edition

Thursday headlines: Is you heard yet?

From a White House "listening session" to Marjory Stoneman Douglas students speaking at the Florida State House to a televised town hall with the students confronting Marco Rubio and the NRA's Dana Loesch, yesterday was a dramatic day in the pursuit of American gun reform.

It's been one week since the Parkland shooting, and unlike previous incidents, media coverage remains strong.

Responding to parents and students during the White House session, Trump proposed arming teachers as a solution, an idea that was widely panned during the evening town hall. (Also poorly received: Trump’s handwritten reminder to say “I hear you” during the meeting.)

Joint Chiefs of Staff emails contradict Trump's claim that he consulted them prior to his transgender military ban.

What it’s turned into now, people view it as a way to get press and get publicity and get famous. And people are going to get hurt. There’s no doubt in my mind that somebody is going to end up hurt eventually. Everybody is trying to one-up each other more and more. Biohacker regrets past stunts—like self-injecting CRISPR—and says marginalized biohackers may hurt themselves.

RIP Anne Treisman, who revolutionized how we understand attention. A brief video briefly explains her theory of selective attention, which explains how we pick out a known face in a crowded room.

The riveting story of the worst roommate ever—a serial squatter whose only apparent goal was to manipulate.

Researchers connect heavy drinking to early-onset dementia—though other risk factors may also play a role.

Assessing site design and other methods children learn for how to spot fake news are now frighteningly obsolete.

On aging avatars: rather than a reminder of death, but as a celebration of personal change.

Non-white Christians are increasingly looking past whitewashed practices and incorporating indigenous traditions.

The "Ring of Fire" is usually an excuse for journalists not to research a country's particular geologic setting.

Curiosity's sole destination is a mountain it may not reach, and that could hold clues to Mars's climate history.

The FCC will likely publish its net neutrality repeal order today—and now the lawsuits can officially begin.

FCC Chair Ajit Pai wants to cripple a government program that subsidizes broadband for those who otherwise couldn't afford it.

Vaccine skeptic Kennedy says Trump, despite early interest in studying vaccine-autism links, has gone silent.

Among the Swiss "animal dignity" laws: No boiling lobsters alive, no flushing goldfish, no punishing barking dogs.

Following user complaints (and one from Tony Hawk), Emojipedia corrects its lobster, DNA, and skateboard.

Someone may have scammed Spotify for at least $288K with a chain of accounts replaying a suspicious playlist.

To help residents of water-rationed Cape Town limit their shower times, some of South Africa's biggest musical artists reworked their hits to last exactly 120 seconds.

Anticipating autonomous vehicles, contenders are coming for Google with high-definition maps.

Intricate folded-paper tessellations by Ekaterina Lukasheva.

A musically and visually percussive video by Damien Tran with music by Alix Lhoumeau.