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Headlines Edition

Tuesday Headlines: Clueless in Gaza.

Funerals begin in Gaza after 58 Palestinians were killed and 2,700 were injured in conflict with Israeli forces during the controversial inauguration of the US embassy in Jerusalem.

Israel and the White House pin the violence on Hamas, and refuse to bear responsibility for an outcome that was obvious the moment the embassy's relocation was announced.

America's history of breaking treaties and withdrawing from international agreements is older than the US itself.

If Republicans hold onto the House and expand their Senate majority in 2018, expect a revival of the ACA repeal.

"Tens of thousands of defections, desertions, and mass casualties" have made Assad desperate for soldiers.

The World Health Organization intends to eliminate trans fats—estimated to cause 500,000 early deaths a year—around the world by 2023.

RIP Margot Kidder, the "definitive" Lois Lane who later became a prominent mental-health advocate.

Those nine minutes were a near miss of modern American history, between the dark aftermath of a deadly, mass political assassination and our own reality, in which most people don’t think very often about June 14, 2017. The story of the Congressional baseball shooting that could have devastated America, then was quickly forgotten.

A dozen Google employees resigned over a Pentagon contract that has skewed the company's internal transparency.

As permafrost melts and Arctic cities' foundations fail, residents plan for future structures built on solid rock.

California's health system is measuring how effective "food as medicine" is for diabetes and heart disease patients.

Scientists develop a compound that can stop a cold by disrupting the enzyme that helps the virus infect our bodies.

Our first-ever Tournament of Books nonfiction event continues. Today we discuss the conclusion to Tara Westover’s harrowing, inspiring Educated.

Among reasons for believing in chemtrails and weather control: as a means to find solace amid weather disasters.

A Farm Security Administration photo editor altered the Great Depression's narrative by hole-punching negatives.

A photo of a rainbow-painted park bench inspired a Twitter conversation about design that's hostile to the homeless.

Stanley Kubrick's photos from the late 1940s, when he was a photographer in New York City for Look magazine.