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Headlines!

Tuesday headlines: Tsundoku there solastalgia.

The president’s former lawyer will detail to Congress this week how he witnessed "lies, racism and cheating" during a decade with Trump.

US House members will vote today on a measure to undo Trump’s “national emergency.” It will probably also clear the GOP-controlled Senate.

Britain’s Labour party now supports another referendum on Brexit.

An eye-opening day in the life of a company, and specifically an office culture, designed for employees with autism.

A promising biodegradable replacement for plastics could be engineered from polymers inspired by squid teeth.

Things you can give your kid instead of a smartphone: an art desk, a smart watch, an iPad with good apps.

Why have we evolved to be less violent than chimpanzees? Is it because we've killed off incurably violent men along the way?

The world is literally designed for men, from crash-test dummies to office layouts, and it puts women’s lives at risk.

Erin Aubry Kaplan on Michelle Obama’s Becoming and her reluctance to address black discontent.

Here’s every reason you need to explain to somebody why Green Book is the worst.

RIP, Stanley Donen, former Broadway chorus boy who went on to direct Charade and Singin' in the Rain.

Breezy illustrations from Seoul's Jee-ook Choi.

"Tsundoku" is a Japanese term used to describe a person who owns a lot of unread literature.

"Solastalgia" refers to the psychic pain of climate change and "missing a home that’s transforming before your eyes."

Nevada City, Calif., launches “Goat Fund Me” to rent herds of goats to munch on fire-prone underbrush.

In India, cow vigilante violence—involving mob attacks on Muslims and other minorities—has surged since 2014.

Photographs by Alejandro Cegarra covering six years of the crisis in Venezuela, with comments by Jon Lee Anderson.

See also: A map of New Deal photography, 1934-1944.

A new book showcases never-before-seen photographs of space travel from NASA's archives.

FYI: Earth’s atmosphere is a lot larger than previously known.