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Wednesday Headlines: Stupid like a fox.

After a federal judge revived most of the DACA protections on Jan. 9, Sessions announced yesterday that the DoJ would sidestep the US Court of Appeals and take the case directly to the Supreme Court.

Hoping to avoid a government shutdown, and with immigration at an impasse, Congressional Republicans bait Democrats with a stopgap spending measure that includes long-term funding of the Children's Health Insurance Program.

Even if the Senate Democrats had the votes to reinstate net neutrality, it wouldn't get past Trump or the House.

On Monday night, US authorities arrested a former CIA officer accused of intentionally compromising intelligence operations to the Chinese government, leading to the arrests and deaths of multiple sources.

This week in cognitive assessment: Here is the test that Trump aced. Here is the Hawaiian ballistic missile alert interface.

The White House says Senators Perdue and Cotton heard "shithouse," not "shithole," which explains their TV denials.

Israel searches for a tourist who may have Jerusalem syndrome, where people believe they're Biblical figures.

Google's selfie-portrait app is bereft of Asian faces, returning limited, sometimes offensive, matches.

A contraceptive app that tracks vital signs to predict fertility has been blamed for 37 unwanted pregnancies.

Kazakhstan's new, non-Cyrillic alphabet is heavy on apostrophes, making it difficult to read or Google.

Sad news: After nearly a decade, The Awl is closing shop.

Andrei Lacatusu depicts social media logos in their future, derelict state.

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy creates photorealistic ghost towns by erasing everything from buildings except the facades.

Florida man, briefly: From Daytona to Disney to divorce, an illustrated recollection of a manic two weeks in Orlando.

The periodic table rearranged as a timeline of when each element "was first used, observed, or predicted."