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Wednesday headlines: And the word of the year is…

The contest to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions in the Senate is finally over, and the Democrat won.

The president says the loss in Alabama, despite his endorsement, is no big deal; after all, he saw it coming.

A Democrat hasn’t won a Senate seat in Alabama in almost three decades—and now the Senate’s in play.

Some quick satire from Andy Borowitz: “Devastated Roy Moore Consoles Himself by Heading to Mall.

Merriam Webster's word of the year is "feminism," after searches for it on their website increased 70% in 2017.

For tracking purposes: here’s a tally of the 60+ (so far) firings, resignations, and suspensions over sexual misconduct.

Routing apps + ride-share apps = previously quiet neighborhoods turned into dangerous traffic zones.

Macron offers millions of euros to US scientists—in “Make Our Planet Great Again" grants—if they'll move to France.

Decentralized water, food stores, secret hideaways: how Switzerland has prepared itself for the end of the world.

A Mexican journalist, detained in Texas, pleads for asylum, fearing he'll be killed by the Mexican military.

Saudi Arabia's thirtysomething Crown Prince lifts the country's thirty-plus-year ban on movie theaters.

Among the best trends from Hollywood in 2017: arm casts, title shout-outs, Charlize Theron's coats.

Bruce Brown, director of The Endless Summer, dies at 80 and surfing loses its filmmaker.

A fun interactive simulation shows how far certain pop songs have traveled through outer space via radio waves.

Spotify just named “serialism” as one of the year’s “biggest emerging genres.” We’re a little surprised.

Video: Some oddly jazzy narration and soundtrack for a short 1963 British Pathé documentary on candlemaking.

“The simulation argument is appealing, in part, because it gives atheists a way to talk about spirituality. The idea that we’re living in only a part of reality, with the whole permanently beyond our reach, can be a source of awe.” In case you missed it, here’s a fun one from last year: “What are the odds we are living in a computer simulation?”